Thursday, February 22, 2018

#WIPpet Wednesday - No Filter Take Two - #lgbtqia

Another crazy-busy week, but not in a bad way. :) It does mean I missed my Monday blog post yet again, although the way I’ve been ranting, it’s probably for the best.

Anyway, I’ve finally re-opened No Filter today, and the first thing I did was change it from first- to third-person. Why? Well, a couple of days ago, I put up a FB status about omniscient narration, which a few people responded to (including some, erm, helpful explanations of what omniscient narration is and is not).

I’m OK with any kind of narration—even head-hopping—if it suits the story. But readers generally have their favourites, and there will always be someone who isn’t happy with how the story is told. Well, they can always write their own story if they so wish.

Thanks to Bonita for reminding me that, in the end, “we need to satisfy that voice inside that tells us our choice is the right one!”

So, third-person it is. :)

Brief story info:
No Filter is a crossover novella of the Hiding Behind The Couch and Checking Him Out series(es), featuring Libby (and others) from HBTC, and Matty (and others) from CHO.

WIPpet maths for 22nd February:
(I'm a day late)
22/2 * 18 = 198 words

And the WIPpet Snippet:
“Will you check through this email?” Matty started reading over what he’d typed. No squiggly lines. That was a good sign. “Noo?” He glanced behind him. “Oh! He’s gone.”

Noah had been lying on the bed when Matty started typing, he wasn’t sure how long ago that was. Writing emails took all his concentration, but maybe autocorrect would be enough. If he’d thought about it, he’d have used his laptop, which had text-to-speech, because his phone wasn’t that clever, but it was done now.

I’ll just send it as it is—did I tell Libby I was dyslexic? I think I did.

He went to click send, wavered, and hit ‘save’ instead. Noah couldn’t have gone that far, and a few more minutes wouldn’t make any difference.

Matty couldn’t believe he’d left it so long to get in touch. Nearly a year and a half had passed since he’d shown Libby around campus and they’d exchanged email addresses. Taking prospective students on guided tours was part of his mentoring job, and he’d given plenty in the past three years, to lots of interesting young people from all walks of life, but he’d only swapped email addresses the once.

* * * * *

What is WIPpet Wednesday?
WIPpet Wednesday is a blog hop where authors share from their current works in progress - expertly organised/hosted by Emily Wrayburn - and the excerpt has to relate to the date in some way. For links to other fabulous authors' WIPpets, visit: http://www.inlinkz.com/wpview.php?id=355404


Thanks for reading
Deb x

6 comments:

  1. Wasn't the other crossover also in third person? It would make sense for this one to be also. Not that something in a series can't be different. I just mean it won't seem weird to anyone who has read both series.

    I think I contributed to the POV mess, so I'm sorry. I do tend to have, um, no filter sometimes. :/ In any case, I don't see what difference it makes what type of narration an author uses. I had a super weird conversation about verb tense recently that went kind of the same way, so I get it.

    Nice snippet. Another one I'm looking forward to reading. I like being in Matty's head this time. I feel for him here--I have two people in my house who ask me to go over their messages before sending.

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    1. Yes, the other crossover is third-person, but I think I had in mind that I'd do this one first-person so there was one of each (with HBTC being in third and CHO in first). It was very difficult to write Matty in first-person - he's too...flitty. And the idea of writing Libby in first-person...haha. I think I may need my semi-omniscient therapist for that one. :D

      I struggle sometimes with present tense, but that's on me, and I wish a) more readers would be honest in acknowledging it's their preference not the author getting it wrong, and b) we authors could stop giving a sh*t.

      Delete
  2. Yeah, I might have contributed to that mess as well. IMO it boils down to it's your work, so do what suits you. If you're not happy with it, readers will sense it.

    I like the WIPpet, and am now determined that I must get to reading your work. (I'm a slow reader at best, but I will get it done).

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    Replies
    1. I enjoyed the discussion of narrative forms - what you said was absolutely fine (likewise for Amy). I'm too long in the writing/editing teeth to quietly put up with someone telling me what's what, but you didn't, so...thanks for joining the discussion. :)

      There are so many books to be written and read and never enough time - I'm a slow reader too, hence I still haven't got as far as your SF series, but I do love your writing.

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  3. I used to always say I wasn't the biggest fan of first person, though I have realised more recently that that applies mostly to when there's more than one POV character, because I find there is often very little difference between the two voices. If I'm just following one character, the type of voice doesn't usually bother me.

    I love this WIPpet! Is there a reason why he took so long to contact Libby again? And is there some major error in his message Noah is going to pick up on and he's going to be very relieved he didn't take the plunge and hit send just yet?

    (Also, apologies if you get two variations on this comment. I tried posting one under my Emily Wrayburn google account this morning, but it looked like it got eaten, so I'm trying again).

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  4. Anonymous12:37 pm

    I had an editor tell me last summer that first person was frowned upon, and I should reconsider using it for my short story - and then say I'd done it very well. I kept it- it made the most sense for this story - and it's gotten rave reviews and a Pushcart Prize nomination.

    Really, the author is the final arbiter.

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